Bush does it so we can too

“No. Not at all. It’s a tacit acknowledgement that we’re doing smart things to get information to protect the American people,” the President said. “I’ve said to the people that we don’t torture, and we don’t.” Bush: ‘We Don’t Torture’

CIA Foresaw Interrogation Issues

The CIA concluded that criminal, administrative or civil investigations stemming from harsh interrogation tactics were “virtually inevitable,” leading the agency to seek legal support from the Justice Department, according to a CIA official’s statement in court documents filed yesterday.

The CIA said it had identified more than 7,000 pages of classified memos, e-mails and other records relating to its secret prison and interrogation program, but maintained that the materials cannot be released because they relate to, in part, communications between CIA and Justice Department attorneys or discussions with the White House.

Nineteen of those documents were withheld from disclosure specifically because the Bush administration decided they are covered by a “presidential communications privilege,” according to the filings, made in federal court in Manhattan. Some were “authored or solicited and received by the President’s senior advisors in connection with a decision, or potential decision, to be made by the president.”

Bush has said that he has not ordered people in be tortured in the name of the U.S. That assertion has been comically taken up by the Right not in lock step denial, but telling us all the wonderful benefits of torture with the dusty old ticking bomb scenario in tow. If taking on all the powers and prerogatives of a king torture chambers included, then why did Bush lie. If torture is the Right’s idea of virtue, why hide behind non-existent ticking bombs and partisan babble. Why not just say the words, torture is good, long live the king for torturing. One of the reasons is that that kind of behavior endangers our troops, foreign service employees and tends to get thrown back in our face we when we criticize other nation’s human rights record, Calling the Kettle Black

First Give a Fair Trial to the Detainees at Guantanamo …

On the rare occasion that U.S. officials venture to look critically at Malaysia’s detention policies, the local authorities have a ready response: Guantanamo.

Last December, the Malaysian government arrested and detained five Hindu rights activists under the ISA, in a blatant attempt to intimidate the activists from pressing claims of racial discrimination. The U.S. State Department responded critically to the detentions, though it did not condemn them directly.

Without mentioning the Internal Security Act, or even referring explicitly to the question of detention without trial, State Department spokesman Sean McCormack expressed concern for the legal rights of the detainees. It was the U.S. government’s expectation, he said, that the detainees “would be provided the full protections under Malaysian law, that they would be given due process, that they would be accorded all the rights accorded to any other citizen, and that this [would] be done in a speedy and transparent manner.”

The Malaysians’ reply was swift. “Can they [the United States] first of all give a fair trial to the detainees in Guantanamo Bay?” asked Deputy Prime Minister Najib Razak. “We’ll only respond if they do so.”